Saturday, April 16, 2016

Can We Be Done With "Creepy" Now?

Remember “random”? You know that few years when you heard, “...that’s so random!” all the time? And I think this was not only folks common for who worked with kids. “Random” was everywhere, and mostly what people meant was "coincidental" or "unexpected."  But, like most slang, it died. In my experience, and I have nothing but anecdotal data to prove this, slang dies for one of two main reasons: Condition 1-adults (or advertisers) pick it up and make it uncool, and/or, Condition 2-it gets used so commonly and ubiquitously that it loses it’s meaning. I submit that with "creepy" we are almost at Condition 1 and we are definitely at Condition 2.

There’s an educational point to this...and I promise I will get there.

Can we please be done with "Creepy" as a thing now?

I’ve been feeling this way for a while, largely because of how it gets used by students for things that are really innocuous but are also new/different/unusual/unexpected. And then I saw this on Twitter:

I am not attacking anyone, not Engadget, nor Rick King, but this slang term...I’m ready for it to go, especially when our kids use it as ubiquitously and randonly (see what I did there?) as they are.

This is linguistic and vocabulary laziness that is indicative of intellectual laziness and I’m ready to be done with it; we call it lazy writing instructionally. On some level, aren’t we all ready to be done with lazy thinking?

This drone is not coming-on to the water recipient in a sexually aggressive way, nor is it stalking him with malicious intent. It’s trying to bring him some water...which, as it’s a “delivery, he asked for in the first place. Can someone explain exactly what is creepy here? Is it new? Sure. Unorthodox? Definitely. A thing we’ve never seen before? Potentially, but in no way is that “creepy”

Let’s define terms. Language and communication only work when we all agree that the words we use mean the same things to all of us; word definition is not the best place for personal interpretation.

Dictionary.com defines creepy thusly:
Slang. of, relating to, or characteristic of a person who is a creep; obnoxious; weird. (http://www.dictionary.com/browse/creepy)

Not good.  Let's click on creep in that definition.  When you then click on “creep” you see this:

So, they’re all negative connotations.

If you want to see what they say synonyms are, click here, but I assure you they’re not pleasant.

So here is the edtech tie-in, and in part, adults and school officials who approach edtech and specifically the internet from ONLY a harm-avoidance/reduction model are responsible for the student mindset I am about to explain. If you paint something as only dangerous, that's what the perception of it will become. But also our current linguistic over-reliance on this word when what we mean is “new”, or “not used to it” is becoming a problem in edtech...at least in my view.

One of the teachers I support has had a few students (and then a few more) in her middle and high school classes, where she is a frequent Google Classroom user, copy the assignment into a new doc and do the work there, specifically so she cannot open it up and see what they are doing. And here’ the thing, they’re not doing anything inappropriate, they’re working. She’s not doing anything inappropriate, she’s working. In fact, she’s utilizing the thing that so many of us love about Google Apps for Education (GAFE), namely: live document collaboration. When we asked the students why they were doing it, they responded with some version of, “it’s creepy just having my teacher in there [the doc] whenever.” When we asked what was “creepy” about it, in true middle and high school fashion, either “I dunno” or “it just is.”

No. I’m sorry. Not sufficient. When you accuse a teacher of being “creepy” you’d better have some damn thought behind it. Not everyone takes that word so lightly. We think in language.  Words indicate thought--words mean something important.

Was the teacher doing anything out of order here? Absolutely not.

Does the word “creepy" have a negative, sexually aggressive, stalker-like connotation? Absolutely yes. And before you tell me I am overreacting or over-thinking this, Let’s try a little 2nd grade empathy. How would you like it if a kid told you (and then each other) your teaching practice, especially one that you saw as progressive, revolutionary, and “how the new generation learns,” was “creepy?" For those of us who pride ourselves on being responsive to students, that’s not a good day. Then add an anti-edtech parent into the mix….not good.

Language works because we all agree words have the same meaning for all of us. Slang is a purposeful attempt to subvert that commonality to create exclusive use by a group of people. I get that. Further, I get why kids do that, and I have no problem with that as a concept. I don’t think students, and now more and more adults, are specifically trying to paint each other with this particular (creepy) brush, but we are. And we increasingly use this term because something is basically unfamiliar.

Is that really the mindset we want our kids walking into the wide and diverse world full of amazing, different and unusual new things, that all those things are “creepy”?

Yeah, me neither. So how about we all knock it off and use our bigger words. And while we’re at it, how about we call it out in our kids, and use it as a teachable moment?

Monday, April 4, 2016

Choose Your Crater: Deciding Your Leadership Role

Before I really delve into this blog, I am going to ask you to participate in a brief thought exercise.
If you have said or thought either of these things…

  • “Good principals are rare, I hope I get to work with one some day.”
  • “I can’t become an administrator, that would be going over to the ‘dark side’,” OR “I doubt I’d be a good administrator, I’m too __________.”

...then ask yourself if you even allow for the idea of a good principal in your thinking.

Image by Cynthia Nixon:

We Are Asteroids in the Education Cosmos


I am finishing my second full year as an instructional coach.  The learning curve has been steep in so many areas that sometimes it is difficult to unpack it all.  Despite that, I have done a lot of reflection during this time, and it helps me when I get questions from my fellow teachers and fellow instructional coaches.  Recently in the #TOSAChat Voxer group, there was a discussion about being a coach and how we impact our school communities, and the possibility of going into administration and leadership.

Many in the discussion voiced the, “oh, I could never go into admin…” sentiment, followed by one of several typical reasons.  They speculated that they are either too introverted/shy/fragile/emotional/reactive/opinionated to be a principal, which is always amusing to me.  Do these teachers think their principals don’t have emotions and opinions, or aren’t subject to the harder parts of human interactions? We all know administrators aren’t robots, right?  I think this point of view goes hand-in-glove with the jokes that teachers make and hear about “going to the dark side” when one of our colleagues talks about going into administration.  If the people who make those kinds of jokes also claim to be openly collaborative, I tend to treat that claim with a bit of skepticism.

The other main reason I hear for not wanting to be a coach or administrator is that they would “miss the kids too much.”  Indeed, this was the sibling sentiment to a question I was asked what felt like constantly for the first 6 months of being a TOSA, “Don't you miss the kids?”  Please note the word “the,” not “your.”  Implicit in the thinking behind that question is the assumption that I was no longer working with students.  It is difficult to explain how incorrect that assumption is and how much it says about the person who asks it without the explanation sounding like a rebuke.  Because here’s the thing, and there’s no denying it--I was in classrooms with kids all the time, often several classrooms per day.  I was getting to meet kids in four different and new (to me) schools at grade levels I never would have encountered in my middle school classroom position, to say nothing of the dozens upon dozens of talented teachers I was now getting to work with.

And the truth was, my feelings were complicated on the topic.  I was hired mid-year from my middle school classroom, and some of the kids I left behind were fantastic humans and I missed them terribly; the ones I’d had for 7th and 8th were amongst my favorites.  But as classroom teachers we have to say goodbye to our students every year (or every few years if you get to loop with your kids), so this was nothing new.  On the other hand, I felt like I became the educational equivalent of a grandparent in my role as a TOSA.  Every time I came into their classroom students got excited.  It meant we were going to do something new with fun toys (edtech devices), we were going to do it long enough for them to get really enthusiastic about it, and then I would hand them back to their educational parent--the classroom teacher.  It was the first time that I understood why my mom wanted to be a grandparent.  In any case, I myself was still having a direct impact on kids, and an indirect impact through their teachers.  The difference was that my impact was broader, affecting a greater number of students; it was just not as deep or personal.

Another new aspect to my job was working with site and district leadership in a way I hadn’t had the chance to before, and again on a scale that wouldn’t have been possible as a classroom teacher.  About the work of site administrators as it pertains to this topic, I would say two things.  First, whether it’s in the office, while monitoring lunch or recess, or during classroom visits, administrators generally spend at least a portion of their day with students.  They don’t like doing discipline any better than you do, but interacting with students is a highlight of the day for most of the ones I have worked with.  So, while it’s generally true that they don’t know each student as well as their classroom teachers, site admin generally know more of them by name...and not just “those kids.”  Again, impact that is broader and less direct.  But you cannot dispute the fact that site-based and central office administrators have an impact on students, often through their teachers.  They have an impact on school culture, district culture, spending and budgets, and site and district priorities, to name a few.

Now certainly, these are not the same kinds of impacts that classroom teachers have, and are probably not as fun.  However, I think we’d all be hard-pressed to claim that these items have no impact on students.  And I cannot think of a classroom teacher, or even a TOSA, who has not been frustrated by or disagreed with a decision that has been made above them, and known with every fiber of their being that the decision should have gone in another direction.

So, if this frustration is universal, it seems the best way to abate it is for people who have strong educational points of view or visions to go into leadership.  Become the principal you wish you had.  How many of you had a favorite teacher that you tried (or still try) to emulate in the classroom?  What about non-examples--do you remember a teacher you make sure not to mimic?  Well, why shouldn’t that be true for site and district leadership? Never really had a great mentor?  Why not go become the coach you always wanted?  Meeting the new challenge of working with fellow Teachers is very rewarding, and you’ll find that good teaching is always good teaching, regardless of the student’s age.  And here’s where all this talk of impact comes in.  You have to choose your crater; what kind of asteroid will you be?

All Craters Are Evidence of Impact


In education, no one’s crater is deeper than the classroom teacher’s crater.  Their impact is profound and personal.  They get to spend the most time with their students and witness and influence a child’s growth most carefully.  Without doubt, a great teacher can have a lifetime impact on their students--your school memories prove this.   But, this is always going to be contained and confined to the students in that teacher’s class.  So while deep, a teacher’s crater is narrow.

A principal has a different impact and a different crater.  Principals obviously have an effect on the entire school, so their crater is broader than the classroom teachers’ are, but it’s not nearly as direct or personal.  That said, I have seen some amazing principals make some very real and personal changes in students’ lives.

TOSAs, or instructional coaches, have yet another kind of crater.  Their impact, depending on their assignment, is broad, possibly broader than a site principal’s (if they work with multiple sites), and generally more indirect than direct.  They interact with students through other teachers and, in my case, help principals make decisions that impact teachers and students.  So again--broader, but less deep; and yet, still important.

In the model of this analogy, the higher you go in school and district leadership, the broader, yet shallower your impact on the lives and learning of students is.  So your job delineates what kind of asteroid you are.  There are no better or worse asteroids, they’re just different, and they have different kinds of impact.

And Now, the Ask 


Consider the possibility that your career in education may not end in the classroom.

Acknowledge that you are a skilled and intelligent educational practitioner.  Accept that there is a difference between not wanting to and not being able to do certain jobs. Recognize that the person who can best implement your ideas about education, how to support teachers and schools, and what’s best for kids, is you.  And know that if you choose to be a different kind of asteroid, you’ll still be you, you’ll still get to fly through the cosmos, and you’ll still have an impact.  But you have to give yourself a chance to choose.

Thursday, March 10, 2016

Challenge Accepted, & With My Usual Verbose Aplomb


Kristen Witt, the principal of Fairfield High School,  who was also the last principal I worked for before I left the classroom, is one of those people who, when you're dreaming about starting an Ideal school and you can hand-pick the people you want to work with, is right at the top of your list.  In addition to being one of my favorite Educators, and one of my favorite leaders, she's one of my favorite human beings on the planet.  She has issued this 1-2-3-4-5 Blog Challenge to me.  I think it's a good chance for reflection and consideration.  Plus, I never back down from a Kristen Witt challenge, they’re always a good idea and usually pretty fun.

1. What has been your ONE biggest struggle during this school year? 


My biggest struggle this year has been maintaining realistic expectations of myself and others.  I am an Educational Technology Specialist, a teacher-coach.  Like every coach, I expect my team to improve and have a more winning record than they did last year.  The problem with that  expectation, for me, is keeping it based in reality.  The last two years in this position, working with some amazing teachers, I feel like we have all made some great strides in terms of our Edtech integration.  But, I have a goal in mind.  I have an idea of where I want to go, where I would like to see my teachers’ practice and comfort level, and what kind of edtech-facilitated student learning and creativity I’d like to see.  At the beginning of this professional journey I knew that we weren't going to get there in 3 years, or even in 5...I’ve heard it takes 7 years minimum to change organizational culture.  Intellectually, I understand all this.

But I am a goal-oriented person and I push myself, and sometimes I let the vision of achieving that goal get ahead of reality.  I would be lying if I said I wasn't a little bit disappointed in where “we”  were in relation to the vision in my head.  However, that would completely fail to take into account the growth that all the teachers I work with and I have made professionally.  And make no mistake, the growth is real.  My struggle has been to maintain patience with myself, and then respectively with my client-teachers, on achieving what I see as important for their practice and student learning.  It's not really okay to disregard progress and growth simply because it doesn't match the chart you have in your head and the end result you’ve decided you want to see.  We spend a lot of time talking about how students learn and grow in different ways and at different rates and how we need to be okay with that as educators.  Yet, as professionals, we seldom afford ourselves or our colleagues the same consideration and acknowledgement of variety, diversity, and human differences.  Patience is, as it has been, a struggle for me.

2. Share TWO accomplishments you are proud of from this school year.

Before I answer this question I have to get on a soapbox that I am usually on with teachers. And here it is, as a profession we are terrible at singing our own praises and recognizing our own achievements and accomplishments. That has to stop. If you are not telling your story, someone else is. Part of being able to tell your story effectively is, yes, talk about the achievements of your students, but also to be able to talk about your own accomplishments. Teachers should reflect on this question more often, increased self-awareness and recognition of your own accomplishments is never a bad thing. It doesn't mean you're not humble, and it doesn't mean you're a braggart.

I would say the first accomplishment that I'm proud of  is an ongoing collaborative project with Stacie Ryan, a 3rd grade teacher at Anna Kyle Elementary.  Last year Stacie began blogging with her students. If you know anything about blogging you know that what makes it really engaging for students is having an actual audience and receiving genuine comments.  And 3rd graders, as I imagine all of us would, get bored receiving comments from the same audience members (in their class) over and over.  She was looking for a way to connect her students with other blogging students.  There was a service called Quadblogging known in edtech circles, but that service, which connected teachers and students to a regular audience for their students’ blogs, appears to be defunct. So Stacie approached me about planning a way to simplify the process for teachers to find other students to comment on her students’ blogs.  The solution we came up with was, from a technical standpoint, fairly simple.  Instead of spending any time as a service matching up teachers, we simply let them all deposit there pertinent information into a Google form and let them find their own partners, because we believe in autonomy.  The next part, what could be termed as the heavy lifting, was for the two of us to leverage our personal learning networks, and social media to get the word out to teachers all over. At this point we have empowered, over 50 teachers from all over the United States (& Canada and Dubai) to connect with other teachers and their students for mutual blogging an audience connection.

 The second accomplishment that I'm proud of is the FSUSD Google Educator Cadre.  There are several levels of Google Apps for Education (GAFE) certification.  Google Educator level 1 can be done on your own using the training center materials, but I had a different idea.  I thought it might be useful to teachers to get them together in a space where they could work at their own pace in peer groups for mutual support, learning, and collaboration.   The idea of self-pacing and collaborative learning was intrinsic to my plan.  Letting teachers who wanted to take the time and initiative see that, when given the support of like-minded peers, they are capable of achieving this certification was important in my view.

When I put out the email to the district teachers explaining what the program was, that it would involve 3 Saturdays, I expected to get no more than 20 applicants.  I got over 60.  I enlisted the help of another Ed Tech Specialist, Dawn Kasperson, and we were able give 28 teachers three  Saturdays of self-paced, collaborative, study-group style learning with our support.  So many expressed gratitude at the format of the Cadre; they seemed to really appreciate not having to march to a presenter’s drum.  Another goal I had was to get teachers out of their sight-based silos to make connections with their grade-level peers at other schools.



Overall, regardless of what metric you use, whether it's number of teachers achieving the certification, or connections between teachers at different schools formed, or people who felt like they're learning and comfort in the GAFE Suite was increased, I would definitely say there was some success, and this program has room for improvement.  But, I am not afraid of reflection and refinement.

The reason I am proud of our Google Educator Cadre is that it was something brand-new to the district, and an undertaking I had never done before.  In those senses, I feel like that it happened at all and that the response we got was generally positive, and people are still expressing interest, are enough to make me feel that it is a program worth improving; I’ll take that as a win.


3. What are THREE things you wish to accomplish before the end of the school year?


  1. At the start of this year, Dawn Kasperson and I, who are the main GAFE trainers in our district, set out on an ambitious plan to more-than-double the number of professional development topics we offered in our GAFE tools cycle.  We picked these topics based on teacher requests and what we saw as emerging needs.  We offered 8 topics in 2014-15 and designed 18 topics in 2015-16.  I am not sure I realized how much more difficult these higher level PDs would be to develop.  I would like to finish creating the last of the new topics and be able to offer each twice before this school years ends.
  2. For the last 2 years Warren Herrera, Dawn Kasperson and I have run a week long PD camp for district clerical staff which we call “The Classified GAFE Cycle.”  In the past we have done this in the 3rd week of June. Based on attendee feedback, we’ve moved it to the 3rd week of July, and will be revising and hopefully improving the materials.  I am hoping we can get this done before we leave for the summer.
  3. I am a Google for Education Certified Trainer, but it has always been a goal of mine to be what is now called a Google for Education Certified Innovator, commonly called a Google Certified Innovator, previously known as a Google Certified Teacher.  To achieve this, one must be accepted to a Google for Education Innovation Academy.  I suspect the application will open again before the close of the school year.  I  would like to finally get my application together and submitted.


4. Give FOUR reasons why you remain in education in today's rough culture.


  1. Because I believe, as King George VI of the UK said, “The highest of distinctions is service to others.”  And further, I believe, the highest kind of service to others is the education of our children.
  2. Because I firmly believe that the best way to improve everything in education is high quality, well-planned, thoughtfully made, and considerately delivered professional development, and I have discovered a deep ardor for making and delivering that professional development.
  3. Because school was my safe place growing up and I must do everything to make sure that this is still true for children today.
  4. Because I love teaching and learning with both children and adults.  I cannot imagine another career where this is possible.


5. Which FIVE people do you hope will take the challenge of answering these questions?


There are a lot of people who could be on this list.  lucky for them, I am restricted to 5.  Each of the individuals is someone I consider a friend, a colleague, and a peer.  Every single one of them is on my short-list of folks who I want to come with me when I start my Ideal School.  As far as I am concerned, the people below are a “Seal Team Six” of public education.
  1. Dr. Melissa Farrar Ed.D. - Melissa is my current boss.  She has been and continues to be an outstanding mentor.  I feel like she has personified servant leadership, and Tina Fey’s thought on being a leader in her book Bossy Pants, “In most cases being a good boss means hiring talented people and then getting out of their way.”  She has taught and teaches me as much about professional self-awareness as she has leadership.  She continues to be my role model in the area of calm, and, “Yes and...”
  2. Ariana Flewelling - EdTechAri is a friend, colleague, and creative in-putter whose acquaintance I made over twitter and through a #GAFESummit and whose friendship I was able to foster over Voxer.  She is 1 of 2 people on this list that are testaments to the amazing power of a Personal Learning Network.  Ari is an edtech coach in Riverside Unified School District, and a Google Certified Trainer and recently became a Google Certified Innovator.
  3. Susan Stewart - Susan is another person who started as a person in my PLN and has now grown to be a full-on, real-life friend.  Susan’s cheerful voice and verbal “smirk” have made her one of my go-to humans on Voxer.  She is also a Google Certified Trainer and has a Leading Edge Certification. Yeah, she’s totes legit! Susan is also an Edtech Coach and is a specialist in an area that perplexes me--primary.  Check out her website.
  4. Gayle Horsma - Gayle is a teammate of mine in FSUSD.  Like me she is an Edtech Specialist , but different to me, Gayle has a specialized focus.  In addition to being a Level 1 Google Educator and SeeSaw Ambassador, she is our Kinder-Code Specialist in our Title I kindergartens.  When I met her, she was one of my client-teachers and has quickly grown to be a trusted and amazing teammate. I feel fortunate to have her to collaborate with.
  5. Dr. Stacie Ryan Ed.D. - Stacie Ryan is a teacher in my district and has been a friend of mine for a few years.  We initially met through our local teacher’s association.  She was one of those people you meet and, although you’ve just met them you think, “I bet she’s a good teacher,” but you never get to see them teach.  Then when I became her Edtech coach and got to see her work, my thought was, “Wow! I had no idea it was going to be this amazing.”  Stacie is a dynamo, who never stops learning and is constantly trying to grow her practice and become the best teacher…anywhere, ever.  She is currently in the middle of National Board Certification. I am lucky to get to work with her.


Just found #GoogleSheets #addon: Essay Metrics. Haven't tested it, but looks awesome. #GAFE https://t.co/35HcvqHHuF https://t.co/BF54er6Hd7


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

March 10, 2016 at 03:26PM
via IFTTT

@TheGoogleGooru: 3 updates to Google Classroom you should try out today #GAFE https://t.co/lZ7T7We4ii https://t.co/GP08ybkfmt


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

March 10, 2016 at 12:33PM
via IFTTT

@edtechteam: #EdChatME #edchatma #ctedchat Prepare for Level 2 #GAFE certification at our #gafebootcamp - https://t.co/AK8HQJL8MW


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

March 10, 2016 at 10:11AM
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Monday, March 7, 2016

@armstrongedtech: April 8 - Google Apps Ninja Bootcamp. Just added to https://t.co/h2Pl44C4Su Limited Seats! @Crippit @edtechteam #gafesummit #MapleSyrupEdu


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

March 07, 2016 at 09:13PM
via IFTTT

@TheGoogleGooru: 3 updates to Google Classroom you should try out today #GAFE https://t.co/rR3Y1384b1 https://t.co/Rh3ctmXlHD


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

March 07, 2016 at 04:32PM
via IFTTT

@texthelp: Good morning #SXSWEdu early birds! Hope to see you soon at #GoogleEdu's Fiber Space. @GoogleforEdu #GAFE #edtech https://t.co/v6kXVYnK0K


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

March 07, 2016 at 07:33AM
via IFTTT

Saturday, March 5, 2016

@TheGoogleGooru: 3 updates to Google Classroom you should try out today #GAFE https://t.co/bhdYV63pPB https://t.co/MLVotYjTlG


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

March 05, 2016 at 07:33PM
via IFTTT

RT @MrAdamPE: Are You Formnomenal ? https://t.co/IJZgyS4Lpj #physed #pegeeks #peblogs #gafe #mlearning #pesuperpower #cpchat #NQT https://t.co/hgkIzvIe5h


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

March 05, 2016 at 04:30PM
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RT @craigyen: District just needs to open up Blogger if you would like to use it #GAFE #cuerockstar Via @CVRscience7


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

March 05, 2016 at 10:56AM
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Thursday, March 3, 2016

Wednesday, March 2, 2016

Raise your hand if you're excited about new lesson plan templates in @GoogleDocs!


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

March 02, 2016 at 12:16PM
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Saturday, February 27, 2016

.@GoogleForEdu Pls look at your Level 1 Training Ctr Smart Search examples. The example of "minus" is broken. #GAFE https://t.co/NX0WgrOWtT


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 27, 2016 at 10:14AM
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Expect a New new #GoogleDrive in the next year or so...


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 27, 2016 at 09:36AM
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Friday, February 26, 2016

@jlscheffer: Inside the Google Innovator Academy-Day 1 #GoogleEI #MTV16 #GAFE


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 26, 2016 at 10:07PM
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Whew! Did you see all of those Forms updates? Catch em all in this ep of the Apps Show https://t.co/CsLoiDeiYN #GAFE https://t.co/nOoN4ZybRU


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 26, 2016 at 05:29AM
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Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

@kehall16: Great tips for all those using Chromebooks! This should be in every Chromebook classroom! #aussieED #GAFE #edtech https://t.co/CqzlmFCDM0


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 23, 2016 at 10:05PM
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RT @GoogleForEdu: IT Admins: Time = money, and you can save both! Sign up for #GAFE today → https://t.co/0IwGBoB9hn https://t.co/EjgUVldVTC


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 23, 2016 at 07:45PM
via IFTTT

RT @ShakeUpLearning: Create a #GoogleClassroom Custom Header with #GoogleDrawings https://t.co/03IvqLsEhG #gafe #googleedu #edtech


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 23, 2016 at 05:59AM
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Monday, February 22, 2016

Friday, February 19, 2016

Thursday, February 18, 2016

#GoogleDocs Revision History is an invaluable tool for grp assignment accountability & cut-&-paste monitoring. #GAFE https://t.co/zNyJBxrgMv


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 18, 2016 at 11:49PM
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RT @GoogleForEdu: Play ball! See how creative educators share real-time data in #GAFE for smarter coaching https://t.co/1z8zAidD9A https://t.co/sUxuW3dLge


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 18, 2016 at 08:21AM
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RT @kehall16: Some awesome examples being shared in this community - worth checking it out! #edtech #GAFE https://t.co/gZYtCDUVzN


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 17, 2016 at 11:56PM
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Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Tuesday, February 16, 2016

Monday, February 15, 2016

Sunday, February 14, 2016

RT @KarlyMoura: #TOSAChat gets Googley tomorrow night at 8PM PST! Join us for a chat all about add-ons & #chrome extensions 👍 #GAFE https://t.co/TNRupYFyPk


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 14, 2016 at 09:10PM
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RT @kehall16: Love this! Great example of substitution with a hefty price tag! #aussieED #edtechchat #edtech https://t.co/e9rccJjIvZ


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 14, 2016 at 08:41PM
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RT @MJMadda: Personalized Learning: A Waste of Time, or the Answer to America's Education Issues? https://t.co/8HpTM4uVKX #edtech via EdSurge


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 14, 2016 at 06:43PM
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RT @cho_liz: Ran into the whole #gafesummit #edtech team at Starbucks. Of course had to get the last ussie! Awesome. https://t.co/pmOrGzKiMw


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 14, 2016 at 12:10AM
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Saturday, February 13, 2016

@EdTechAri what was the name of the app that was "like padlet, but with polling"? DotNotes? #edtech


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 13, 2016 at 04:29PM
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Dedicated #EdTech #FSUSD Teacher in the Google Educator Cadre-HS Cohort collaborating on Level 1 https://t.co/WTN9VfTM9U


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 13, 2016 at 11:05AM
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Friday, February 12, 2016

RT @shannon_potts: Post commonly used links into the #material section of #googleclassroom for easy access for #students @followmolly #gafesummit #GoogleEdu


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 12, 2016 at 05:36PM
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RT @edtechteam: Bring a GAFE Bootcamp to YOU: https://t.co/mle8fie6jm #gafesummit #edchat #edtech https://t.co/6N7inntFXp


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 12, 2016 at 02:16PM
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RT @edtechteam: #gafesummit: #DigitalEquity means ___. Join us Feb 17th for #DLDay: https://t.co/WVWapGtpeo #edchat #edtech https://t.co/AfIREm2TRE


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 12, 2016 at 11:12AM
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Thursday, February 11, 2016

@GoogleForEdu: Forms is getting even more personal. Keep track of Ss responses & more gems


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 11, 2016 at 06:33PM
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@GoogleForEdu: Stay in(FORM)ed on the moment when someone fills out your Form w new notifications


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 11, 2016 at 11:27AM
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The New Google Forms template had a few #education gems for you to build on. #ExitTicket #GAFE #Edtech https://t.co/rEO9cn8huY


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 11, 2016 at 09:59AM
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The New Google Forms template had a few #education gems for you to build on. #ExitTicket #GAFE #Edtech https://t.co/rEO9cn8huY


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 11, 2016 at 09:59AM
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New #GoogleForms w/ add-ons support but where did they put the controls? https://t.co/iMH8mt3U86 @googledocs #GAFE https://t.co/R5wqoilHlX


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 11, 2016 at 09:35AM
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@EminenceSchools: Eminence #EdTech Tips: Some New Updates to Google Forms


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 11, 2016 at 06:01AM
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Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Google Apps update alerts: New #GoogleForms, w/ #addons support (#Finally), response tracking & MUCH more https://t.co/iMH8mt3U86 #GAFE


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 10, 2016 at 05:09PM
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#GoogleDocs: Grading Tips & Tricks https://t.co/FfHNUj4FyQ via @Catlin_Tucker #GAFE


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 10, 2016 at 03:07PM
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Tutorial: Setting Preferences on #GoogleDocs to Save Time Grading https://t.co/ouLharjHA8 via @YouTube #GAFE #EdTech


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 10, 2016 at 11:21AM
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Tutorial: Setting Preferences on #GoogleDocs to Save Time Grading https://t.co/ouLharjHA8 via @YouTube #GAFE #EdTech


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 10, 2016 at 11:21AM
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Sunday, February 7, 2016

RT @TechCoachSusan: The tools are continuously evolving, but most important are the ones you have available. Use the tools you have!! #gafesummit @lisegaluga


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 07, 2016 at 03:54PM
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My best moment with a student this year was w/ a teacher I coach seeing what a difference student collaboration thru #edtech. #gafesummit


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 07, 2016 at 08:56AM
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Thursday, February 4, 2016

@GoogleForEdu: Write on! #GAFE allows students to collaborate in real time & improve their writing quality


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 04, 2016 at 07:00PM
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Only 1 in 4 schools teach computer science. To fix this, sign the petition. @codeorg https://t.co/xjooR2MIXw #STEM #Edtech #FSEdTech


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 04, 2016 at 08:39AM
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@MKBHD Do you think the K-12 #edtech market will help buoy the tablet market, or are #chromeOS devices too strong? https://t.co/vyl00vkU69


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 04, 2016 at 01:47AM
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Wednesday, February 3, 2016

RT @GoogleForEdu: Tech implementation can be a long process & providing ongoing support for staff is key https://t.co/HZCHajI4H9 #GAFE https://t.co/HCx2Sk9RQa


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 03, 2016 at 03:22PM
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RT @GoogleForEdu: From 🍰 to Calendar, catch up on everything that happened last month with Google Apps https://t.co/WWPMPAmMeG #GAFE https://t.co/rjJhFBCIq9


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 03, 2016 at 09:16AM
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Great Journal Writing Topic | Design Challenge: Invent a School for Ninjas https://t.co/R5okTvpGSN #Elemchat #Edtech #ELA #ELAChat #BlogChat


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 03, 2016 at 08:39AM
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Monday, February 1, 2016

Josh, Fairfield, CA, #EdTech Tosa, One word I associate with hard convos is "confrontation." #TOSAchat https://t.co/gBS1miBIYd


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 01, 2016 at 08:03PM
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RT @MrSchoenbart: NEW BLOG POST: #GAFE Impact Report Part 3: Findings Summary at https://t.co/7of3ULGqzs #NYEDChat #whatisschool https://t.co/FN4U3Ps7Qc


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 01, 2016 at 07:01PM
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RT @GoogleForEdu: Magic happens when tech meets PD. Ts are finding new, innovative ways to use #GAFE everyday https://t.co/HZCHajZFyH https://t.co/VJn310s1jf


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 01, 2016 at 06:04PM
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Want great #gafe stuff for #primary #Elementary grades? Check out @TechCoachSusan's #eduawesome site TechCoachSusan https://t.co/WsjDHOYwoW


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 01, 2016 at 04:44PM
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Going to the #Roseville #GAFESummit? Check out my sessions on Sunday! #Edtech Schedule: https://t.co/9QXUemUUyH https://t.co/gyfJXoRy9S


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 01, 2016 at 02:45PM
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ImagineEasy: 72 Google Drive Shortcuts You Should Know https://t.co/DZnZmrEgeF #GAFE #GAFEChat #GAFESummit


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

February 01, 2016 at 10:48AM
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Saturday, January 30, 2016

@GoogleForEdu: No Internet? No Problem. 10 Ways to Use @Google Offline #GAFE


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

January 30, 2016 at 01:04PM
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Friday, January 29, 2016

Thursday, January 28, 2016

Counting Down EdSurge's Top Ten S’Cool Tools of 2015 https://t.co/RAAMyAwhNI #edtech via EdSurge


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

January 28, 2016 at 09:29PM
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Keeping up with #Edtech is not easy for #Teachers. @sylviaduckworth has some good ideas. https://t.co/Y9WZCyuBpT


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

January 28, 2016 at 12:25PM
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Tuesday, January 26, 2016

A tool in the fight against email bloat | Messaging on Google Hangouts for Ed Organizations https://t.co/Yb5DnTrfrY #GAFE #FSEdTech #edTech


from Twitter https://twitter.com/EdTechSpec

January 26, 2016 at 07:18PM
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